142016Mar

Two Events: Trauma & Dissociation Workshop, Attachment + Child Trauma Lecture

Event #1:
The Haunted Self: Understanding and Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation, With an Emphasis on Working With Dissociative Parts
A Lecture by Prof. Onno van der Hart, PhD
June 14-15, 2016

Event #2:
Attachment and Child Trauma: Implications for Assessment and Treatment of Families
A Lecture by Prof. Antonia Bifulco, Middlesex University, London
June 19, 2016

Full descriptions and registration details in PDF: Onno van der Hart and Toni Bifulco lectures

_____

Onno van der HartThe Haunted Self: Understanding and Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation, With an Emphasis on Working With Dissociative Parts
Prof. Onno van der Hart, PhD
Two-day Workshop (in English)
Tuesday/Wednesday, June 15-16, 2016

Prof. Onno van der Hart, a leader in the treatment of adult dissociative disorders, will give an advanced workshop focusing on working with parts of the personality while maintaining a focus on the “whole” client and working towards processing traumatic experiences and integrating dissociative parts.

For whom:
Therapists with basic knowledge on complex trauma and dissociation
When:
June 15 and 16, 9:00 to 16:00
Location:
Kehillat Yedidya, Rechov Lifshitz 12, Jerusalem
Cost:
NIS 850 (after May 20th NIS 900)

______


Toni BifulcoAttachment and child trauma: implications for assessment and treatment of families

A Lecture by Prof. Antonia Bifulco, Middlesex University, London
Sunday, June 19
4 – 5:30 PM
Herzog Hospital, Jerusalem

Attachment theory has proved to be a very effective framework in explaining how childhood trauma, interpersonal style, parenting and vulnerability to stress and depression can be related. The implications go across generations, for example to the early life of adults in determining how they make relationships and parent, and through to their children who may be prone to the ill effects of problems in relationship style. The two different generations implicated create challenges for effective assessment and for choice of treatment.

A program of research which examined childhood maltreatment, adult attachment style and clinical depression in London community women is described, together with its sequel examining inter-generational transmission to adolescent offspring. Childhood maltreatment was common in both generations and most attachment styles were insecure. Clinical disorder was common for half of both generations. This was mainly depression and anxiety in the mothers, but also included substance abuse and conduct disorder in the young people.

The findings of the model can be applied within a family therapy approach to treatment. A brief review of evidence for treatment effectiveness will be supplemented with some illustrations from families where the child has been referred for help, with a focus on problems in attachment style of parents with consequences for child’s behavior and distress.

Please share!